High

Curriculum - High School

Our High School program emphasizes the attainment of sophisticated levels of skills in research, the effective use of information, communication, and interpersonal relationships and promotes involvement in the local and global community. ICT plays a major role in our students’ education.

<strong>English</strong><strong>Geometry</strong><strong>Physical Science</strong><strong>Ancient History</strong><strong>French</strong>
This course continues the topics and skills covered in Grade 8 and is based on an integration of Speaking, Listening, Reading and Writing which will further strengthen their communication skills in English. Students will read the different types of literature (fiction, non-fiction, novels, plays, poetry) to think, write and talk about their ideas. Students will use grammar principles to communicate in writing and speaking. They will also develop their vocabulary to promote fluency. The course will also show how to write a process essay in different styles.
This course uses a standards-based approach to the study of geometry and will contain topics traditional to geometry such as congruence, similarity, area, and volume, as well as a brief introduction to trigonometry. Students will study and apply logic, mathematical reasoning, and justification. Where applicable this program involves aspects of algebra, measurement, probability, and data analysis. Thus, this course involves many rigorous aspects of mathematics. Connections to real-world and cross-curricular applications will be made. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1.
This course is designed to allow students to explore the basic concepts of physical science. It is divided into two parts: chemistry and physics. In the first part, students will be introduced to the basic concepts of matter, atoms, periodic table, the vast of chemical reactions in addition to chemistry of acids and bases. In the second part, students will be introduced to the basic concepts of motion, forces, waves, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism. Students will be encouraged to explore the relationship between physical science and everyday life.
This course uses a standards based approach to the study of history. The foundation of this course is the development of skills such as reading, writing, study techniques, public speaking, the formation of sound arguments, source and political cartoon analysis, and understanding perspectives. The topics that will be covered will be analyzed through the study of economics, power, geography and culture/religion. The topics include human prehistory, Mesopotamia, Assyria, Persia, Egypt, and Greece.
The students will continue the work covered in Grade 8, by focusing on oral dialogues. This educational program gives the students the opportunity to express themselves and to practice the language. Our aim is to increase the vocabulary and teach them how to use it when communicating with foreigners. Focuses will include vocabulary and phrases applicable to a number of topics, including “Your Day” leisure time and how to spend it, and aspects of health and medicine.
<strong>English</strong><strong>English SAT Prep</strong><strong>Geometry</strong><strong>Biology</strong><strong>World History 1</strong><strong>French</strong>
This course uses a standards-based approach to the study of English containing four major quarters. Each quarter will focus on an area of need for the students and their levels of need. Students will be able to read and analyze: a) 1st person narratives by a variety of authors, b) 1 novel, c) a play by William Shakespeare, and d) a portion of The Canterbury Tales. Students will have a major writing project each term, coordinating to that term‘s reading and connecting to real-world applications. Students will be able to dissect and identify the various parts of a sentence. Student vocabulary will focus primarily on words used consistently by the SATs. All four quarters are expected to weave together throughout the year.
The SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) preparation will occur within the grade 10 English classes.
This course uses a standards-based approach to the study of Geometry and will contain topics traditional to Geometry such as congruence, similarity, area, and volume, as well as a brief introduction to Trigonometry. Students will study and apply logic, mathematical reasoning, and justification. Where applicable this program involves aspects of Algebra, measurement, probability, and data analysis. Thus, this course involves many rigorous aspects of mathematics. Connections to real-world and cross-curricular applications will be made. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 1.
This course uses a standards-based approach to the study of Biology. Topics include: Part 1: Structure and Function of the cell, Homeostasis and ways of transport of materials and nutrients across the cell, Flow of energy through the cell (Photosynthesis). Part 2: Cell reproduction and Fundamentals of Genetics. Part 3: Classification of microorganisms and Introduction to Kingdoms & Domains. Part 4: Introduction to Ecology including species interaction, properties of communities & energy transfer. Part 5: Plant structure, function & reproduction in plants. In addition to the practical course which allows students to apply what they learn in the theoretical part, students will become familiar with the background and terminology of the life sciences which will allow you to continue with Grade 12 Biology. Prerequisite: Basic principles of Life Science.
From Middle Ages to Imperialism This course is a continuation of the skills and topics covered in grade nine. It uses a standards based approach to the study of history. The foundation of this course is a continuation of the development of skills such as reading, writing, study techniques, public speaking, the formulation of sound arguments, source analysis, political cartoon analysis, and understanding perspectives. The topics that will be covered will be analyzed through the study of economics, power, geography and culture/religion. The topics that will be studied are the Byzantine Empire, the middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, Exploration and Expansion, Absolutism, Muslim Empires, East Asia, Revolutions, Enlightenment, and European Imperialism.
This year‘s book, “Allez, Viens 1”, is considered to be an open door to the francophone world. It permits the students to visit more than 30 French speaking countries. Through this book, students will learn how to read and understand written French, to express themselves grammatically in different situations, and to write letters and articles in French. All this will be taught using audio-visual methods, dialogues, and educative films.
<strong>English</strong><strong>Algebra 2</strong><strong>Chemistry</strong><strong>World History 2</strong><strong>French</strong>
Eleventh grade literature will focus on building reading comprehension, expanding vocabulary, and sharpening critical reasoning facilities through an investigation into the development of Western literature. These skills will be honed through lessons that infuse journal response, essays, classroom discussion, formal vocabulary & grammar study, and online blogging. As societies evolve over the centuries, the questions posed to, and answered, by them remain the same. A question such as What is an individual? What does it mean to love? What is freedom? What are the tensions between an individual and society?‘ are perennial, but their answers evolve. The main goal of this class to is to learn how to use literature, and culture, as a tool for understanding how the answers to these questions have developed over time. To do this we will study a range of novels, dramas, and poetry from a Greek, Medieval, Enlightenment, Victorian, and Modern periods. When relevant, texts will be complemented with additional readings from history, psychology, philosophy and sociology.
This course is designed to assist students to successfully complete what they took in their Algebra 1 course and build on the logical thinking skills and topics learned in Geometry. More advanced skills in algebraic operations, such as linear and quadratic functions and relations, conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, graphing all functions, and sequence and series will be explored along with some trigonometric identities. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of both Algebra 1 and Geometry.
This course consists of three parts. The first part is a general review of matter and its properties, the atomic theory from philosophical idea to scientific theory, the periodic law, chemical bonding, and the kinetic molecular theory of matter. The second part introduces students to Physical Chemistry. Basic concepts of thermodynamics, kinetics, and chemical equilibrium are included, along with the application of these concepts to industry. Some aspects of Nuclear Chemistry, including the stability of atomic nuclei and radioactive decay, are outlined. The third part deals with organic chemistry and the large variety of organic compounds, introducing students to different classes of organic compounds, including natural and synthetic ones.
from 1800 to Present Day The grade 11 World History class studies the development of human society and culture from the early 1800s until the present looking in multiple ways at how we have developed and changed over time. Various important themes will be addressed over the course of this class such as the role played by: enlightenment principles, nationalism, industrialization, imperialism and empire building, and the evolution of warfare. The students will study these past themes and look at the resulting problems that mankind has had to face. Problems such as: slavery, colonialism, human rights, living and working conditions, the need for political reform, environmental problems, and the potential for mankind to wipe out all life on this Earth. These issues will all be addressed as we look at their causes and how mankind has attempted to change and correct these problems. The class will conclude with a look at some of the problems we face today as a human society, problems such as: pollution, global warming, nuclear proliferation, and overpopulation. We will then explore various possible solutions to these life threatening problems.
This year students will use the book “Allez, Viens 2”. They will be introduced to different cultures of the world, with a focus on traditions of the French culture in various countries. They will also continue to learn how to express themselves in French by way of interesting, carefully selected lessons designed to increase their ability to read and write and, finally, to communicate in francophone countries.  
<b>Description</b><strong>English</strong><strong>Pre-Calculus</strong><strong>Biology 2</strong><strong>Physics</strong><strong>Psychology</strong><strong>Accounting</strong><strong>Business</strong><strong>Economics</strong><strong>French</strong>

Grade 12 Students:

  • Students choose a number of subjects from grade 12, students must also take SAT 1 (obligatory) & SAT 2 (optional).
  • The SAT 1 testes represent 60% of the total marks. School diploma represents the other 40%.

All students MUST pass SAT 1 to apply for any university. In order to apply for technical facilities i.e.: Pharmacy, Dentistry, Medicine, Engineering, etc.., students MUST sit for SAT 2.

  • The student can sit for the test at the end of G 10 as practice but test scores are counted for the student starting G 11 & G 12. Best scores obtained are taken for universities of the student’s choice.

In 12th grade English we have one main objective: TO PREPARE OUR STUDENTS TO ENTER UNIVERSITY AND MEET THE CHALLENGES THEY WILL FACE WHILE OBTAINING THEIR HIGHER EDUCATION. To accomplish this we will stress the following areas: A. VOCABULARY BUILDING – It is impossible to function using the English language without being able to express yourself and understand what others are trying to express. B. READING –we are trying to get our students to ENJOY reading, and to prepare them for the amount of reading which will be necessary in university. STUDY SKILLS – University presents a whole new atmosphere in which to study. It is our aim to prepare our students to fit into that atmosphere and to learn study skills which will help them achieve their goals. C. RESEARCH, WRITING & PRESENTATION – A major part of university at the present time is based on research; and preparing presentations which are part of the learning process. Our students need to know how to recognize reputable internet sites, how to evaluate material on the sites, how to find material not on the internet, how to choose material which will enhance their project, and finally how to present that project in the best possible way. We hope to help our students in all these areas to enable them to be as successful as possible in the next stage of their lives.
This course is an extension of Algebra 2 with the emphasis on Trigonometry, Limits, and Introductory Calculus topics. All major areas covered in Algebra 2 are reinforced at a greater depth with additional applications, such as Functions and their Graphs, Polynomial and Rational Functions, and Exponential and Logarithmic Functions. Pre-requisite: successful completion of Algebra 2.
The Biology course is divided into 4 sections. The first section focuses on human biology, structure, and functions of various systems in the human body. The circulatory system, the respiratory system, the digestive system, the urinary system, the nervous system and the reproductive system will be outlined. The second section outlines Molecular Biology which includes: types of cell division (mitosis and meiosis); fundamentals of genetics; Mendel’s experiments and his results and conclusions; deduction of 1st and 2nd laws; monohybrid and dihybrid crosses; and a brief description of nucleic acid, DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis. The third section outlines the biochemical reactions in the living cells, photosynthesis, Calven Cycle, electron transport chain, cellular respiration, glycolysis, fermentation, and Krebs cycle. The fourth section outlines the development of cell theory, the structure and function of the cell, and cell organelles, including the interaction of the cell with its environment (Homeostasis and Transport).
The fundamental principles of physics will be reviewed, including: classical mechanics, applications of Newton’s law, conversation laws, forces, and motion. The course will cover an introduction to electricity and magnetism, the electric field, electric potential, circuits; basic concepts of temperature and thermal equilibrium, heat, and specific heat capacity; basics of wave, sound, light; and Atomic and Nuclear Physics.
This course is an introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. A brief historical account of the discipline of psychology and an introduction to the scientific method serve as the foundations of the course. In addition to the biological bases of behavior, basic principles of the psychological processes of human development, learning, diversity, social interaction, sensation and perception, thinking, memory, and personality are presented. An overview of psychological disorders and treatment is also provided, as well as discussions of the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Psychology Course Rationale: The elective course, Psychology, engages students in the understanding, articulation, and dissemination of psychology as a science. Students are introduced to psychology, with focus on the scientific study of human development, learning, motivation, and personality. It emphasizes the empirical examination of behavior and mental processes and it infuses perspectives fostering students‘growth, development, an understanding of cultural diversity. Students of psychology acquire information from a variety of sources, use information as they make decisions and evaluations, and solve problems. The study of psychology enables students to recognize and cope with uncertainty and ambiguity in human behavior. 5 Strands of Psychology: Research Methods, Cognitive Domain, Lifespan Development, Bio-psychological Dimensions, Socio-cultural Dimensions.
This is an introductory course covering the accounting cycle for sole proprietorship. The course will acquaint the student with the basic knowledge of accounting concepts and procedures, to help him gain a greater understanding of basic accounting practices. The student will: use the basic accounting equation; apply the rules of the Double Entry System; document transactions in a General Journal Form; post transactions to the General Ledger; prepare an Unadjusted Trial Balance; record adjusting entries and closing entries; prepare an Adjusted Trial Balance; prepare Financial Statements including an Income Statement, a Statement of Changes in Owner’s Equity, and a Balance Sheet; prepare a Post- closing Trial Balance; record merchandising transactions, including cash and credit sales, cash receipts, cash and credit purchases, cash payments, and different types of related documents; and prepare a detailed income statement for a merchandising business showing the calculation of cost of “goods sold” and the details of operating expenses.
This introductory course to the world of Business, starts with some basic concepts: exploring different forms of business ownership; studying small businesses in detail; and then taking a peak into different branches of Business. Concepts will be studied such as: types of economic systems, economic performance indicators, types of market competition, different forms of business ownership and their advantages and disadvantages, analysis of the small businesses sector and the pros and cons of smallness and franchising, “Management and Organization”, “Human Resources”, “Marketing”, and creating a marketing plan as a course project.
This is an introductory course in Economic theory that presents various economic concepts and ideas such as: economic thinking, scarcity, choice, opportunity, cost, exchange, economic systems, Microeconomics, demand, supply, consumers, producers, the price system, equilibrium, saving, investing, stock market, current events nationally and globally, Macroeconomics, unemployment, inflation, poverty, causes, harm created, solutions, and recommendations. Evaluation tools will be used to measure the performance of economies and to compare and rank different nations.

For M.A.C. students, Grade 12 is the culmination of many years of studying the beautiful French language. Knowledge of French will enrich their travel experiences not only in France, but also in Switzerland, Belgium, Luxembourg, Monaco, the Seychelles, Canada and many African countries. It will help them to appreciate the French culture and also provide a sound base for the study of other Romance languages, such as Spanish, Italian, Romanian, and Portuguese, as well as English: fifty percent of current English vocabulary is derived from French. In Grade 12, students will continue to realize their goal of strengthening their auditory and speaking skills by expanding their vocabulary and their understanding of grammar. This will, in turn, result in greater ease expressing themselves using French in situations such as shopping, asking for directions, reading signs, purchasing train tickets, and ordering from a menu.